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Improve the Health of Your Skin with Red and Near Infrared Light Therapy

The ever-increasing demand for better-looking skin is at an all-time high.  In fact, the number of spa visits per year across the globe has surpassed the 200 million mark.  And it’s estimated the “beauty and anti-aging” market is worth nearly 100 billion dollars.  Pretty amazing, right?  It’s pretty clear that nearly everyone is after a great complexion.

But, the there’s more to our skin than just aesthetics.  In fact, skin is the largest organ of your body and is incredibly important. It protects your body from environmental influences, helps control your body’s water levels, and provides other key functions. But unfortunately, age takes its toll on all of us, including our skin. In addition to natural aging, which is accentuated by outside factors, other skin-related problems can ensue - things like infections, cancer, scars, and other various conditions from acne to psoriasis.1

Heal Skin Damage with Red Light Therapy

You’ve undoubtedly experienced some type of skin issue during your lifetime.  And as you probably know, skin conditions can be painful, uncomfortable, and bad for self-esteem.  It's quite common to seek a medical treatment that will relieve the problem.  Within traditional medicine, the therapeutic options depend on the type of skin problem you're trying to address. In most cases, in order to improve skin conditions and signs of aging, a practitioner will use a wide range of topical treatments and procedures, such as microdermabrasion or chemical peels. And just like other health issues, many people suffering from uncomfortable skin problems also turn to natural remedies to find relief. These include essential oils, salt baths, herbal teas, supplements, and compresses.  Does this sound like you?

But another alternative option - red and near infrared light therapy - has been growing in popularity within the aesthetics field. This treatment has been extensively studied for improving the skin and has become a prominent treatment within the dermatology arena.  Light therapy is an effective treatment that can help a wide variety of skin conditions and is backed by a robust amount of clinical evidence.  While many traditional skin treatments provide temporary relief, these studies have demonstrated real, lasting skin changes resulting from light therapy.

A Wealth of Clinical Research Finds Significant Skin Improvements From Light Therapy

You may have heard that light damages the skin. This is definitely true with UV light. But red and near infrared light therapy, on the other hand, can actually change your skin in positive ways. Research shows that light therapy can both benefit the look of skin and heal the underlying issue that is causing the condition. When red and near infrared light is absorbed by the skin, it stimulates new skin cells to grow in a healthier way, provides protection against damage, and helps heal a variety of skin problems.2  If you want to go deeper, you can read more about the mechanism of action at a cellular level in a previous article we published.

No surprisingly, there’s a robust amount of clinical research that has demonstrated specific benefits of light therapy related to the skin. An extensive meta analysis in a 2013 issue of Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery evaluated many ways in which light therapy can be used for the skin, some of which are outlined in the proceeding paragraphs.2

Specific to anti-aging, this meta analysis discussed numerous studies showing that LED light therapy can actually reduce and counteract signs of aging in the skin.  Red and near infrared light has been shown to boost collagen, smooth wrinkles, enhance tone, as well as a host of other benefits.  Also of note, while light therapy boosted positive skin results, it also reduced an enzyme that contributes to skin damage.

A 2014 controlled trial in Photomedicine and Laser Surgery also backed up the use of red and near infrared light therapy to treat skin aging. The treatment boosted collagen and participants experienced a better look and feel in their skin, which was supported by photographs. Overall, researchers found light therapy to be safe and effective.3

Better Skin Health with Light Therapy

Regarding acne, the same 2013 meta analysis we mentioned before highlighted studies finding red and near infrared light to be effective for the treatment of acne. Of note, it explained that red light impacts sebum production, which contributes to acne, in addition to the control of cytokines, which impacts skin inflammation.2

The meta analysis also showed that light therapy resolved psoriasis in patients that were not helped by traditional treatments, improved pigmentation in patients with vitiligo disorder, and reduced episode of herpes. It also boosted healing and improved scars and burns. Overall, the authors of the meta analysis noted that light therapy could be used for many skin concerns because of its wide range of positive results. It was particularly effective for healing and skin regeneration, as well as reducing inflammation and cellular necrosis.

The Consensus is Clear: Numerous Clinical Studies Provide Solid Evidence that Light Therapy is an Effective Skin Treatment

An abundance of clinical studies have demonstrated that red and near infrared light therapy benefits the skin while reducing potential issues. But, it’s essential to use the right wavelengths within the red and near infrared spectrum, along with optimal power output. A device like the Joovv Light will allow for short and effective treatment times in the comfort of your own home.  Skin rejuvenation has never been easier!

Sources:

(1) MacNeal, R J. Overview of the Skin. Merck Manual.

(2) Avci P, Gupta A, et al. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring. Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery. Mar 2013; 32(1): 41-52.

(3) Wunsch A and Matuschka K. A Controlled Trial to Determine the Efficacy of Red and Near-Infrared Light Treatment in Patient Satisfaction, Reduction of Fine Lines, Wrinkles, Skin Roughness, and Intradermal Collagen Density Increase. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery. Feb 2014; 32(2): 93-100.